While some people were dreading the arrival of the 13 series number plate, it seems the traditionally unlucky number is safeguarding drivers against accidents.

Research shows the traditionally unlucky number is safeguarding drivers against accidents.

Research by car insurance specialist Admiral has revealed that those driving a car with a ‘13’ plate had the lowest accident rate of any new car owners in the last ten years.

Earlier in the year superstitious motorists were avoiding the ‘13’ plate and opting for personalised number plates instead, leading garages to ask the DVLA whether the number could be skipped.

The ‘13’ plate marked the period between March and September, but worried drivers had nothing to fear after all with the research finding that these had not only the lowest accident rate but also the lowest overall claim rate of any registration plate in the last 10 years.

Admiral managing director, Sue Longthorn, commented: “Many people avoid the number 13 because they fear it is unlucky. With the period of 13 number plates ending recently we wanted to see if there was any correlation between this traditionally unlucky number and accident rates.

“It was a nice surprise to find that compared with the previous 10 years of number plates, those driving a 13 plate were the least likely to have an accident in the first six months on the road. It certainly debunks the superstition that 13 is an unlucky number.”

Highest accident rates

The number plate with the highest percentage of accidents in the first six months on the road was the 54 plate, which was issued in September 2004.

Owners of cars with those plates were 53% more likely to have an accident and 56% more likely to make a claim in the first six months than those with a 13 plate.

The 56 plate took second place, with 55, 53 and 04 accounting for the rest of the top five. The 13 plate came in 21st, or last place.

If you sustained an injury in a road traffic accident that was not your fault, we can pursue an accident claim on your behalf where blame or negligence can be proved to lie elsewhere.